Hacienda Heights

Hacienda Heights is an unincorporated suburban community and census-designated place in Los Angeles County, California, United States. As of the 2010 census, the community had a total population of 54,038, up from 53,122 at the 2000 census.

Originally an agricultural town, beginning in the 1940s and accelerating in the 1950s, suburban residential development, which occurred southward (beginning on subdivisions near Kwis Avenue), transformed Hacienda Heights into a residential or bedroom community. In 1961, the Hacienda Heights Branch of the Los Angeles County Public Library opened. The following year, in 1961, the area was renamed Hacienda Heights. In 1964, the local newspaper, the Hacienda Heights Highlander, was established.

The 2010 United States Census reported that Hacienda Heights had a population of 54,038. The population density was 4,832.4 people per square mile (1,865.8/km²). The racial makeup of Hacienda Heights was 21,873 (40.5%) White (14.9% Non-Hispanic White), 743 (1.4%) African American, 315 (0.6%) Native American, 21,065 (37.1%) Asian, 99 (0.2%) Pacific Islander, 9,199 (17.0%) from other races, and 1,744 (3.2%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 24,608 persons (45.5%).

The “Puente Hills Landfill Native Habitat Preservation Authority” supports public enjoyment and access of the nearby parkland in the Puente Hills.

Hsi Lai Temple (meaning “Coming West”) is the largest Buddhist temple in North America. The temple encompasses 15 acres (61,000 m2) and a floor area of 102,432 sq ft (9,516.2 m2). The temple’s Ming dynasty (1368–1644 AD) and Qing dynasty (1644–1911 AD) architecture is faithful to the traditional style of buildings, Chinese gardens, and statuary of ancient Chinese monasteries. Hsi Lai was built to serve as a spiritual and cultural center for those interested in learning Buddhism and Chinese culture


Hacienda Heights Featured Properties